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Member
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-26-2015
Accepted Solution

How to programmatically test for Suspicious Transaction Filter

Is there a way to programmatically test for the Suspicious Transaction Filter in the fraud detection suite? I'm looking for a test credit card number I can use of a setting or something. Right now, the only way I know of to test that it works is to fire off a transaction (e.g. CreateCustomerProfileTransaction > profileTransAuthCapture) and then use the transaction id to fire off GetTransactionDetails and then check for the presence of the following. Is that correct? However, the test credit card numbers we are using never trigger this filter. Any way I can test this?

 

<FDSFilterAction>report</FDSFilterAction>
<FDSFilters>

  <FDSFilter>

    <name>Suspicious Transaction Filter</name>

    <action>report</action>

  </FDSFilter>

</FDSFilters>


Accepted Solutions
Solution
Accepted by topic author davestevens
‎08-21-2015 01:58 AM
Member
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-26-2015

Re: How to programmatically test for Suspicious Transaction Filter

Also, just wanted to post a how a programmer can detect if the suspicious transaction filter fires. Each CreateCustomerProfileTransaction call returns a transId, which can then be used to call GetTransactionDetails. Whenever the suspicious transaction filter the GetTransactionDetails will show an FDS section that looks like the following.

<soap:Body>

      <GetTransactionDetailsResponse xmlns="https://api.authorize.net/soap/v1/">

         <GetTransactionDetailsResult>

            <resultCode>Ok</resultCode>

            <transaction>

               <transId>2230828436</transId>

               <FDSFilterAction>report</FDSFilterAction>

               <FDSFilters>

                  <FDSFilter>

                     <name>Suspicious Transaction Filter</name>

                     <action>report</action>

                  </FDSFilter>

               </FDSFilters>

 

Note, I have yet to verify this in a production environment. However, Joy did confirm that this is what the response will look like.

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All Replies
Expert
Posts: 4,525
Registered: ‎03-08-2010

Re: How to programmatically test for Suspicious Transaction Filter

Which filter? It is in one of these tiggers?

http://developer.authorize.net/tools/errorgenerationguide/

Member
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-26-2015

Re: How to programmatically test for Suspicious Transaction Filter

Thanks for the link. But I think this only applies to the "Enhanced AVS Handling Filter" and the "Enhanced CCV Handling Filter" filters. I'm trying to test out the "Suspicious Transaction Filter".

Administrator Administrator
Administrator
Posts: 563
Registered: ‎08-03-2011

Re: How to programmatically test for Suspicious Transaction Filter

 

Hi davestevens,

 

Not all filters will work on sandbox accounts, the ones that will not work are the following:

 

  • Shipping Address Verification Filter
  • IP-Shipping Address Mismatch Filter
  • Regional IP Address Filter
  • Suspicious Transaction Filter

 

Basically, they are the filters that rely on external services like the IP Address geolocation service and USPS address verification service used for the first 3 filters.

 

Thanks,

Joy

Solution
Accepted by topic author davestevens
‎08-21-2015 01:58 AM
Member
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-26-2015

Re: How to programmatically test for Suspicious Transaction Filter

Also, just wanted to post a how a programmer can detect if the suspicious transaction filter fires. Each CreateCustomerProfileTransaction call returns a transId, which can then be used to call GetTransactionDetails. Whenever the suspicious transaction filter the GetTransactionDetails will show an FDS section that looks like the following.

<soap:Body>

      <GetTransactionDetailsResponse xmlns="https://api.authorize.net/soap/v1/">

         <GetTransactionDetailsResult>

            <resultCode>Ok</resultCode>

            <transaction>

               <transId>2230828436</transId>

               <FDSFilterAction>report</FDSFilterAction>

               <FDSFilters>

                  <FDSFilter>

                     <name>Suspicious Transaction Filter</name>

                     <action>report</action>

                  </FDSFilter>

               </FDSFilters>

 

Note, I have yet to verify this in a production environment. However, Joy did confirm that this is what the response will look like.